Friday, April 4, 2014

The Transcendence of Arthur Hall Smith’s Artwork



“At the beginning it seems like chaos, but in the end, you sense the order. “[1]

 Within this statement, Arthur Hall Smith reveals the dynamic nature of his style and work, which encompasses a combination of abstract and figurative elements. The body of Smith’s work indicates the many artistic transitions that occurred during his career. As he shifted between various mediums and techniques.

Smith worked simultaneously on abstract and figurative works throughout his career but one image we have on view now shows how his abstract paintings come directly from the figure and nature. In this work, watch how Smith didactically abstracts the human form through a series of simple abstract gestures. This piece demonstrates how his abstraction comes from a figurative source. Yet, as viewers, it is the reconciliation of these elements, which creates a dynamic piece that resonates with us.

Untitled, n.d., ink on paper, 10”x 17-1/2” (Sight).


Smith states, “[My] goal in drawings is to achieve an equivalence between the rhythm of the line and the poetry of the subject."[2]

 

Figure study group, n.d., ink on paper, 18”x 23”, Private Collection

 
Thus, it is evident that Smith’s style is an actuation of these goals. This work specifically shows the qualities that he hoped to embody in his figure drawings. It is a delicate array of line, rhythm, and poetry. This work ultimately shows how Smith composed his abstract work.


A Gathering, 2007, mixed media on paper, 32-1/1” x24-3/8”, Private Collection

 

Arthur Hall Smith’s works will be on display at the Luther W. Brady Art Gallery until April 4th.



[1] Arthur Hall Smith. By The George Washington University. Persistent Productions: Documentary, Film,
     and Design. 2008. Web. 2 Apr. 2014.
[2] http://www.usbr.gov/museumproperty/art/biosmith.html


 

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Howard Hodgkin: Paintings - May 16, 2012

Friday, April 4, 2014

The Transcendence of Arthur Hall Smith’s Artwork



“At the beginning it seems like chaos, but in the end, you sense the order. “[1]

 Within this statement, Arthur Hall Smith reveals the dynamic nature of his style and work, which encompasses a combination of abstract and figurative elements. The body of Smith’s work indicates the many artistic transitions that occurred during his career. As he shifted between various mediums and techniques.

Smith worked simultaneously on abstract and figurative works throughout his career but one image we have on view now shows how his abstract paintings come directly from the figure and nature. In this work, watch how Smith didactically abstracts the human form through a series of simple abstract gestures. This piece demonstrates how his abstraction comes from a figurative source. Yet, as viewers, it is the reconciliation of these elements, which creates a dynamic piece that resonates with us.

Untitled, n.d., ink on paper, 10”x 17-1/2” (Sight).


Smith states, “[My] goal in drawings is to achieve an equivalence between the rhythm of the line and the poetry of the subject."[2]

 

Figure study group, n.d., ink on paper, 18”x 23”, Private Collection

 
Thus, it is evident that Smith’s style is an actuation of these goals. This work specifically shows the qualities that he hoped to embody in his figure drawings. It is a delicate array of line, rhythm, and poetry. This work ultimately shows how Smith composed his abstract work.


A Gathering, 2007, mixed media on paper, 32-1/1” x24-3/8”, Private Collection

 

Arthur Hall Smith’s works will be on display at the Luther W. Brady Art Gallery until April 4th.



[1] Arthur Hall Smith. By The George Washington University. Persistent Productions: Documentary, Film,
     and Design. 2008. Web. 2 Apr. 2014.
[2] http://www.usbr.gov/museumproperty/art/biosmith.html


 

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Washington, District of Columbia, United States
"Found In Collection" or simply "FIC" is the way many museums classify the more mysterious items in their possession that have little or no documentation. Here at the Luther W. Brady Art Gallery of the George Washington University, we do keep extensive records of our collection, but some of the items we come across in academic buildings or our own storage can leave us wondering. This blog is an effort to showcase some of the more curious examples and their stories, and to provide a glimpse of the great variety of art pieces within the collection. To learn more about the Brady Gallery's history, recent exhibitions, or the George Washington University, take a look at the links below.

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